We are what we attract, or so it says in this book. I initially purchased this book for my husband and it does offer some interesting reading material, just not really what I thought it would be after reading so many glowing reviews about the book. Clearly, one does have to be open-minded when reading this book, but also take it all with a grain of salt. It more reminds me of "The Secret" and all of it's hype when it was so popular. According to my understanding of the basic concepts of the book is that everything that happens or lack there of begins in our own minds. Yes, true, that "as so a man think, he becomes". The value of this book is in promoting the idea that you have more control over your life than you think. The mind is capable of a lot, including how your body lives, how you present yourself to other people, etc. When you have a positive train of thought, you will have better health, better prosperity and better life in general. That simply is true and cannot be denied. I think this book is a good stepping stone on where to begin, but is seems reminiscent of Napoleon Hill's, "Think and Grow Rich," or James Allen's, "As a Man Thinketh,". What the book doesn't tell you is that when negative things happen to you, your positive attitude can turn those things into far less tragic events. There are other books that will make this more clear.

"Scientific experiments using a placebo effect for health reasons have shown that if you believe something will make you feel better. Rven if it is a sugar pill and not a true medication, it will cause you to think you feel better and then you do. ... Every time you think of a negative thought, you need three positives ones to negate it. If you focus all your positive energy on a positive outcome, it will happen. You can see this with prayer, as people focus on sending a positive message up in prayer for a positive outcome," Estes explains.
Model successful people. Those with the luck factor understand that other people’s success can be modeled and repeated. As a result, they spend time researching the thoughts, beliefs, habits, decisions and actions of very successful individuals. They subsequently model their patterns of behavior in order to obtain their own personal goals and objectives.
When things get tough you’ve got two choices: you can either fold or you can keep going. Lucky people are very resilient. I remember talking to one lucky person that had fallen down some stairs and broken his leg. I said, “I bet you don’t consider yourself quite so lucky now.” He said the last time he went to a hospital he met a nurse and they fell in love. Now the two of them are happily married twenty-five years later. He said, “It was the best thing that ever happened to me… So, yeah, things can look bad now, but the long term effect of this might be very, very positive.” That’s a very resilient attitude. Lucky people tend to have that sort of approach.
Neil, I have never heard a so called "doctor" speak so unprofessionally. I'm sure you are aware of the certain psychology that enables some people to make certain remarks behind the safety of their computer? If not, you would do well to look it up. It is evident that you are feeling defensive enough about this subject to make such immature comments, very telling indeed.
Turn your bad luck into good luck. Lucky people see the positive side of their bad luck. They do not dwell on their ill fortune. They embrace failure and view it as an opportunity to learn and grow. Lucky people usually are more resilient when bad things happen to them. They believe that good things will happen and avoid dwelling on negative things.

Emmet Fox wrote about metaphysics and the power of prayer in essays and books. His teachings are founded in Christianity and bible stories. He cites Jesus Christ as being the greatest teacher of metaphysics who ever lived and explains that thoughts are our most important emanation, more important than what we say or what we do. In the books Power Through Constructive Thinking and Find and Use your Inner Power Fox speaks about "building the mental equivalent of what you want and to expunge those that you don't".
Yes, I am familiar with that phrase, although not sure how it applies to this situation. I am the source and you would like me to consider myself? I do not have an employer. Psychology Today provides a forum for articles and discussions. They do not hire me or pay me. They are not the source of this information. I take full responsibility for the content.
The researchers found that by activating good luck beliefs, these objects were consistently able to boost people’s self-confidence and that this up-tick in self-assurance in turn affected a wide range of performance. Lucky thinking, it turned out in this study, positively affected people’s ability to solve puzzles and to remember the pictures depicted on thirty-six different cards, and it improved their putting performance in golf! In fact, people with a lucky charm performed significantly better than did the people who had none.
9) Mindless: To invoke a LOA, you need to live continuously in an unreal future as you anticipate that it will be once you’ve achieved your goal and only visualize a successful outcome. This shows faith in the universe. Thinking about plans, actions, and challenges are discordant and negative so skip the process and focus on the result; live without regard to the present. This is the definition of mindlessness. Being fully aware of and attentive to the here and now is mindfulness and has been shown to produce powerful health and wellness benefits such as greater life satisfaction and happiness.
You may not have discovered your passion or your life’s work yet. Unless you attempt new things, you may never discover what that is. Keep an open mind to all possibilities. You don’t know if you could be an talented ceramicist unless you pick up a lump of clay and give it a go. How do you know that you aren't a gifted energy healer? Or an amazing tarot reader? No-one ever said, on their death-bed, “Gosh, I wish I hadn’t done all those things.” People who broaden their minds and their life experience become interesting characters who attract good luck and good friends.

The New Thought movement (Law of Attraction Origins) grew out of the teachings of Phineas Quimby in the early 19th century. Early in his life, Quimby was diagnosed with tuberculosis. Unfortunately, medicinal treatment wasn't working, so he began carriage riding through his hometown, Lebanon, New Hampshire. He then regained his health and recovered, an event that prompted his study of "mind over body".[10] Although he never used the words 'Law of Attraction', he explained this in a statement that captured the concept in the field of health:

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