"The first step is to infuse change into a system or process--this by itself may produce amazing results. But even more important is to notice what happens afterwards. Going in, you may have expected or hoped for A, B, and C to occur. Yet the most impactful outcome to the organization may be an E or F choice. Since they were unplanned or unexpected, one might call them 'luck.' In fact, it is just an awareness of positive results rather than being committed to expectations."

Almost 90 percent of lucky people said that they trusted their intuition when it came to personal relationships, and almost 80 percent said it played a vital role in their career choices… About 20 percent more lucky than unlucky people used their intuition when it came to making important financial decisions, and over 20 percent more used their intuition when thinking about their career choices.
Good feelings lead to a good reality. Put on your favorite song, paint a picture, have fun with your pet, or think of someone or something that you love, something that makes you happy, and just shut your eyes and dwell on this. These can be called Frequency Shifters, so have a few up your sleeve. Different thoughts work for different situations, so think of a few now you can use later.

At the end of the experiment, those who imagined they were physically younger showed signs of de-aging. Blood pressure was lowered, arthritis was diminished and even eyesight and hearing in this control group improved. By simply imagining themselves younger, some physical aging was actually reversed. Their thoughts and imagination made this happen.


Yes, I am familiar with that phrase, although not sure how it applies to this situation. I am the source and you would like me to consider myself? I do not have an employer. Psychology Today provides a forum for articles and discussions. They do not hire me or pay me. They are not the source of this information. I take full responsibility for the content.
When things get tough you’ve got two choices: you can either fold or you can keep going. Lucky people are very resilient. I remember talking to one lucky person that had fallen down some stairs and broken his leg. I said, “I bet you don’t consider yourself quite so lucky now.” He said the last time he went to a hospital he met a nurse and they fell in love. Now the two of them are happily married twenty-five years later. He said, “It was the best thing that ever happened to me… So, yeah, things can look bad now, but the long term effect of this might be very, very positive.” That’s a very resilient attitude. Lucky people tend to have that sort of approach.

I stumbled on your page a couple weeks ago. I’ve been coping with post partum depression for the past few months. Although medication has absolutely helped take the edge off, ever since reading your words I’ve felt a consistent and steady rise in my feelings of happiness. The medication helped stabilize my depression, that’s true, but your words helped me tap into my joy. Joy I haven’t felt in years, possibly since I was a child myself.
Life was always very tough, with many 'frienemies', which happens to a girl after marriage. But somewhere deep down, I felt I was good. Besides, I had a husband & 2 children. And so I worked hard at whatever I undertook. It was a typical hare & tortoise story! Today, those troublemakers are struggling with their own problems, while I have made quite a name & earned goodwill in the society.
Since the brain is Velcro for negative experiences, it is natural that we worry so much. It's just the brain's tendency. Keep a worry list for 2 weeks. The minute you start to worry write it down. This not only helps release the heavy energy that often keeps us stuck, but at the end of 2 weeks you will notice none of the worries were warranted. Your brain will have proof that worry is a waste of energy.
"A diplomat, journalist, and economist, Carr was the furthest thing that one could imagine from a starry-eyed spiritual dreamer or a promulgator of superstition. Carr eschewed all forms of ponderous or magical language — yet he also believed in a clear and concrete set of methods for attracting and building upon the fortuitous chance occurrences that crisscross our daily lives. He was an ardent believer that good ethics bring “good luck.” "

You claim that "positive thoughts always resulting in positive things" is not the basis of the LOA. In part you are correct. The foundational basis in science, as I alluded to in the article was that thought stuff particles travel through ether (not air) and interact with formless stuff to create whatever it is that you are thinking about. This was how "the law" started.

The Universe/God has an infinite and abundant reservoir of supplies, waiting to be delivered to the ones who sincerely ask for them. It doesn't judge anyone for asking for more, because, you are expected to live your life on this planet to the fullest. It is the limited thinking and the conditioning that we all have been exposed to from childhood which makes us fear the Universe/God; in fact it is not something to be feared at all. It's like the genie from the 'Arabian Nights' - Your wish is its command. Don't be scared. Go ahead ask for everything and anything that you want and believe that you have received them.
The reason why luck does not seem to favor you is because of your constant preoccupation with “negative” thinking which is the direct result of limiting thoughts in your subconscious mind. The sad part is that a vicious cycle gets formed – the negative thinking causes events that are not conducive and these events further aggravate the sense of negativity.
Make the most of chance opportunities. Lucky people are good at creating, noticing and acting upon chance opportunities. They do this by being open and adopting a relaxed attitude toward life, therefore they see what is there rather than only what they are looking for. They view every social interaction as an opportunity for mutual benefit and growth. They talk to a lot of people and keep in touch with them. They don’t just interact with people for the sake of interacting. They actually take time to get to know people on a deeper level. This enables them to seize random opportunities from chance encounters.
“A welcome addition to the field of attraction/prosperity. The book is full of practical strategies for changing luck-repelling behaviors and increasing both fortunate circumstances and the ability to make the most of them. If your customers are serious about removing barriers to their success and happiness, this is a book of practical suggestions that they won’t want to miss.”

We could go back and forth for years about this since your beliefs are based on faith and mine are based on proven effectiveness. You have faith in a system that sometimes seems to work for you and when it doesn't you adapt your thinking to say, this is obviously good for me and that's why I'm attracting it. I would rather make my list of goals based on my values and principles and attain them in an inspired (by a more complete visualization method) in an action-based system where I am in control..
"It takes roughly three times of repeating the positive ideas to negate the negative thoughts. Try a vision board. List five things you want to focus on this month and constantly repeat them daily like a mantra. For example, my vision board says, 'Money flies at me from all directions.' Sometimes, I get a large-paying client, and sometimes, I simply find a quarter on the street. Point being, money is coming to me from everywhere. After you focus on what you want, you need to keep in that mindset. If you allow any negative thoughts to creep in, you will reverse or negate all the work you just did," Estes recommends.
Skeptical Inquirer magazine criticized the lack of falsifiability and testability of these claims.[47] Critics have asserted that the evidence provided is usually anecdotal and that, because of the self-selecting nature of the positive reports, as well as the subjective nature of any results, these reports are susceptible to confirmation bias and selection bias.[48] Physicist Ali Alousi, for instance, criticized it as unmeasurable and questioned the likelihood that thoughts can affect anything outside the head.[1]
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