The author demonstrates how good luck is a matter of personality. Factors like a healthy self-image and certain other attributes can change a negative and failure-prone personality to a positive one that admits no defeat and recognizes that good luck is not an accident. In reality, "good luck" means the attraction of favorable chances by a positive mind-set within. Personality factors that attract luck include a high energy level, generosity and a firmly held belief that one is lucky. Also, the will to attract luck, in the author's own words: "The extent to which we make ourselves luckier is likely to be directly proportional to the force of our will to be lucky. The will to be lucky is the crux of our internal development, the channel through which we can realize our full potentialities as lucky human beings." This is a pleasant read with valuable practical advice that will benefit the reader if applied to her/his life.
It would be impossible to publish research in any respectable peer-reviewed psychology journal that was not up to this high standard with concomitant rigorous statistical analyses. These are the standards in psychology. When someone comes up with a new theory in psychology or any other science, for that theory to be of any use, it has to be able to make predictions and those predictions have to be verifiable. If there is no way to disprove a theory, it can explain everything that happens, yet it doesn't predict anything specific that can be tested, it is considered a poor theory.
Thomas Jefferson said, "I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it." It sounds almost like he could have been a sweeper! The more work you put into entering sweepstakes, the less you need to rely on luck. The amount of luck you need to win when you enter a single sweep is much greater than the amount you need if you enter a few hundred a day.
1) Metaphysical Pseudoscience: LOA proponents claim that it is based on scientific theory. It is at best, metaphysical pseudoscience with conclusions based on erroneous, unfounded, and often incorrect assumptions. The list of incorrect scientific information that is suggested by LOA creators is way too long for article (more details check out “Throw Away Your Vision Board book.” Here are a few of their scientific truths.”
Look. Yes, you should have a vision of what you want your life to look like. I have a very clear vision. But it’s not hanging over my head. It’s in my pocket. Actually, it’s in my phone. And it changes as I change. They are a list of wants and goals but not needs. They do not define me or my worth. My vision acts as a compass. Do I want these things? Fuck yes I want these things. Will I not allow myself to be happy if I don’t obtain them? Nope. Been there, done that. Never again.
If you’re practicing these techniques with something simple, it’s time to take action and expect your results. If you’re using the system to find great parking, get in your car and drive to that parking spot with the full intention and expectation of finding it clear for you. Announce it out loud. “That parking spot is clear for me. I am parking in the spot that is open for me.” Again, we are fully aware that this seems really silly, but it’s a critical step.
Your second point is an interesting discussion. You are correct that in its infancy, psychology was criticized for claiming to be a scientific field and not living up to that assertion by performing quality research. I believe that this question has been put to rest as the rigors of publishing in psychology require randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trials.
The law of attraction is not a magic wand. Because the brain preferentially scans and stores negative experiences, we have to consciously, habitually build the positive mental muscle. We all have layers and layers of stories, limiting beliefs, fears and blocks that have become the interior landscape of our minds and cannot be changed overnight just by thinking positive thoughts.
"A diplomat, journalist, and economist, Carr was the furthest thing that one could imagine from a starry-eyed spiritual dreamer or a promulgator of superstition. Carr eschewed all forms of ponderous or magical language — yet he also believed in a clear and concrete set of methods for attracting and building upon the fortuitous chance occurrences that crisscross our daily lives. He was an ardent believer that good ethics bring “good luck.” "
"Scientific experiments using a placebo effect for health reasons have shown that if you believe something will make you feel better. Rven if it is a sugar pill and not a true medication, it will cause you to think you feel better and then you do. ... Every time you think of a negative thought, you need three positives ones to negate it. If you focus all your positive energy on a positive outcome, it will happen. You can see this with prayer, as people focus on sending a positive message up in prayer for a positive outcome," Estes explains.
During your self-talk, you’ll find yourself wishing for something to happen, some good outcome or the manifestation of a desire. We all do it. Instead of wistfully wishing adopt an attitude of sureness, of knowing that it will come to you. Say, “When that thing I want comes into my life…” instead of “I wish I could have that thing…” Wishing in that way is yearning. Yearning emphasizes what you don’t have. Knowing tells the universe that you are certain it will be delivered. And it will be – unless something better comes along.
Think of it as a radio signal. As you scan through the radio, in-between stations fight for a signal. Most people are pretty familiar with this experience. The two stations compete and occasionally you’ll hear one song and then parts of a different song start to edge in. You’ll notice that neither station comes in perfectly crisp and clear. In the same manner, when you experience doubt or fear, those thoughts and feelings interrupt and compete with your desires.
LOA is one of those things that just baffles me as to why people buy into it. It literally amounts to nothing more substantial than, "Close your eyes, cross your fingers, and wish on a star, then alllllll your dreams will come truuuuuue!" It survives on the average person's ignorance of advanced science and their tendency to assume that someone using big words and "sciencey-sounding" concepts must know what they're talking about.

The Spiritual Explanation: Many people believe that the Law of Attraction works by aligning God or the Universe with our wishes. We are all made of energy, and our energy operates at different frequencies. We can change our frequency of energy with positive thoughts, especially gratitude for what we already have. By using grateful, positive thoughts and feelings and by focusing on our dreams — rather than our frustrations, we can change the frequency of our energy, and the law of attraction brings positive things into our lives. What we attract depends on where and how we focus our attention, but we must believe that it’s already ours, or soon will be.
By implementing daily positive practices in our lives, we will shift and raise our energetic vibration so that we can manifest from a place of calm, inspired action yielding faster results. If you get into the habit of using tools that will insert empowering and positive thoughts into your mind, you'll be poised to produce good experiences and results!
Your second point is an interesting discussion. You are correct that in its infancy, psychology was criticized for claiming to be a scientific field and not living up to that assertion by performing quality research. I believe that this question has been put to rest as the rigors of publishing in psychology require randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trials.
But the one who really first articulated the Law as general principle was Prentice Mulford. Mulford, a pivotal figure in the development of New Thought thinking, discusses the Law of Attraction at length in, for example, his essay "The Law of Success",[15] published 1886-1887. In this, Mulford was followed by other New Thought authors, such as Henry Wood (starting with his God’s Image in Man,[16] 1892), and Ralph Waldo Trine (starting with his first book, What All the World's A-Seeking,[17] 1896). For these authors, the Law of Attraction is concerned not only about health but every aspect of life.[18][19]
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